What I learned from hiking (in 2010)

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I let my beard grow while hiking in 2010. I shave it these days to hide the gray! I hadn’t been on a long distance hike like this in ten years, at the time. The summer for me was a series of section hikes while got in shape to accompany my younger daughter on her through-hike.

The guy who played accordion for my old polka band, Tom Jamrog, is also a long distance hiker and backpacker. He’s done the “Triple Crown” – the AT, PCT, and CDT. He blogs about his trips, and has a vigorous writing style. He recently posed a question on his blog; “what have you learned from Hiking?”  and I decided to answer.

Troop 4 Marlboro, Algonquin Council B.S.A., Camp Resolute

I have been a hiker and backpacker all my life, ever since Boy Scouts. Growing up, my mom generally refused to let us ever play inside the house, even in winter. “So what if it’s cold, put on some mittens and your winter boots and go outside and play!”  and I vividly recall games the neighborhood boys would play in the woods around our house or on the nearby golf course. Usually some variation of Capture The Flag.

As a youthful prank, my friend Kenny Paul and I once threw some firecrackers at the house of a neighbor boy.  (Yes, it was us – the Statute of Limitations has run out, and besides, I think I was eleven years old.) The boy’s mom called the police.  Ken was the star of the crosscountry team, and when the cruiser pulled up with blue lights blinking, I was surprised that I could keep up with him. Two cruisers spent some time in our neighborhood while Kenny and I spent the next three hours eluding them in an apple orchard. hmmmmm……. Later this inspired me to join the cross country team. I ran the the half mile in spring track.  (2:14 was my personal best, if you really must know).

Kenny recently retired from his position as an officer in the United States Marine Corps, and he still is a runner.  My older brother finally rediscovered Kenny’s whereabouts after thirty years. Ken was also an excellent baseball pitcher. Once while on a training run though the neighborhood, a dog came out to chase. Kenny picked up a rock and beaned the dog from fifty feet away, knocking it unconscious. What coordination. I laughed when he told me his USMC specialty was artillery. He spent his adult life throwing stuff at people…..

Misery in the Great Outdoors

Camping with the Boy Scouts included a lot of miserable experiences amidst the fun. I never cooked for myself at home before going camping and trying it there. Baking my first potato in a campfire was half-burnt/half-raw, for example, and one memorable hike during a winter weekend, our patrol ploughed our way through thighdeep snow for three miles on a hike to nowhere. Ultimately I got Eagle Scout. why? mainly because my older brother had done it, and I looked up to him ( still do!).

sash

every Eagle Scout has a merit badge sash. I got twentyone as you can see – the exact number required for Eagle. For each, I can remember who the counselor was, what the activities were, and other trivia.

Other experiences

To answer the specific question, It’s hard for me to separate hiking from Boy Scouts, in terms of what I learned. Don’t disrespect the Boy Scouts – I have some philosophical differences with their current leadership, over their policy toward gay persons and atheists (each of which are just fine with me) but overall the Boy Scouts  fill an important  need. Paul Theroux summed it up for me when he described his experience with the Boy Scouts.

Taking a side trail

During the time I was in Maine I did all the outdoorsy stuff – crosscountry ski, canoe ( the Allagash and Upper West Branch of the Penobscot) , hike, telemark, etc. I climbed Mt Washington and Katahdin in wintertime more than once…. but by comparison, the last few years in Hawaii I went through a period of not doing nearly much adventure-type stuff in the outdoors. Oh well, yeah, I was spending every summer time in rural Nepal teaching with Christian Medical Missionaries and taking day  hikes, doing the Asian Travel thing (no, I did not climb Everest at any time…….that’s the usual Nepal question I get from fellow backpackers…)  and here in Hawaii I was going to the beach (Sandy’s) and dayhiking… but .. it wasn’t the Real Thing. And the weather here is so nice that it’s missing an element …….

Passing it on

I always took my kids on outdoorsy adventures. Glad to have two daughters because then the pressure was off and I knew I would never have to be an adult scout leader. I was saved from having to spend any more weekends with bunches of eleven-year-old boys. (thank you God!) but taught both my girls all the skills anyway. Yes, both my kids learned to make a fire, paddle a canoe, predict the weather by looking at the clouds, and read a topo map. When they were six and eight, we took them on a weeklong canoe camping trip, retracing Thoreau’s path on the Upper West Branch of the Penobscot River in Maine.  When the younger one announced her intention to do a through-hike of the Appalachian Trail in 2010, I was reminded of  long-ago solemn promise made at a campfire,  that I would join her on that quest, should the day ever come.

My daughter, “Whoopie Pie,” on the trail. Much of the A.T. is a long green tunnel. After only a few weeks, Whoopie Pie was doing up to thirty miles a day, often four or five days a week (!) – It’s never been about mileage for me.whoopie-pie-on-trail-2

 

My 2010 hike

When the summons to hike long-distance came, I was old. And fat.  But this served as a personal challenge to get into enough shape to be a respectable hiking buddy. And that’s where the learning began again. In order to keep up with Whoopie Pie, I decided I would do my own solo hike for a few hundred miles and get in shape before hand. And besides, she didn’t want to do the whole thing with me, she was going to hike her own hike. So in May I started off in the hundred or so miles that traverse Massachusetts, averaging eight miles a day through the Berkshires. A few days to recuperate and restarted in Vermont, about two hundred miles through the Green Mountains and into New Hampshire, by this time averaging eleven miles a day.  Another hundred through Shenandoah National Park, and finally co-hiked with Whoopie Pie. By the end of the summer I was not so fat; and I learned that I was not so old, either. I hiked 475 miles in that summer.

Highlights

I think most writers focus on the physical challenge of doing this,  but most of the highlights for me were a bit of the meditative variety, and a good hike serves as a daydream for a long time afterwards. A variety of mountaintops in seven states. Hearing loons on a pond on Vermont, for the first time in five years. The night at the Tom Leonard Lean-to listening to nesting hoot owls.  Cleaning the dead leaves from a mountain spring, and the wonderment of finding a fist-sized jellylike clump of frog’s eggs. The evening Julie and I lay in our bunks in a cabin in Vermont listening to the soft conversations of other hikers during six days of cold rain in the Green Mountains. The “problem bear” at Shenandoah when I was the only person in the lean-to that night. Having heatstroke on two occasions. The bedazzlement of thousands of  butterflies, a cloud of butterflies, in a dewy meadow of wildflowers in Shenandoah National Park. Being sick with bronchitis and experiencing SVT overnight after taking cough medicine, wondering how I would get evacuated from such a remote place. Walking out on my own the next morning.

And of course – Smarts Mountain

The people who comprise the subculture of the Trail are always a highlight, and I learn a lot from them. One day’s hike sticks out.  I got to the FireWarden’s cabin at Smart’s Mountain New Hampshire at the end of a fourteen mile day, knowing for the last five miles that I needed to beat an oncoming thunderstorm. The approach from the south is very steep, with iron rungs forming a sort of ladder over the steepest sections. The rain pelted down, forming a waterfall on the trail as I ascended. At one point my heart sank when the clouds parted and I realized I was nowhere as close as I thought I was. Darkness was approaching and I needed to skedaddle. Lightning was hitting less than a halfmile away as I got above timberline, dashing the last half mile like a frenzied animal.

To get there I had elected to hop past the Trapper John leanto, but to my surprise I was passed from behind at the last minute by Roaring Lion and Snow White,  a pair of through-hikers who had hopped past two leantos, and come from six miles even further south than me that day. I was sprinting after a fourteen miles day, but they were sprinting after a twentymile hike. wow.

On the porch, one other guy who’d come from the north, was already cooking dinner.  The cabin smelled of dead porcupine but the roof was intact. RL, SW, and I each got out of our clothes and did what all long distance hikers do – get into the dry sleeping bag, eat something, and regain some strength. As we lay there we agreed that the lightning was – exciting. Thank God I was smart enough to know how to keep the bag dry.

Everything I learned in Boy Scouts told me not to do what I just did.

Then we had dinner, and the usual bull session as we got to know each other. We shared that special  cameraderie of people who know that what they just did, (hiking uphill into a lightning storm,) was crazy; and yet, who know they are also in the company of others equally crazy.

Best summed in a saying

A friend is somebody who will bail you out of jail. A best friend is somebody who in handcuffed on the bench next to you saying “man, that was awesome”

(with kudos to my buddy Cameron Allen in Pueblo). Later that same summer, I did a 22 mile day in Shenandoah National Park. And a few other feats in which I picked up the tootsies and put them down. The highlight was to hold my own when I finally caught up with my old hiking buddy, Whoopie Pie.

From then on, for the rest of that summer, I knew: I can still push myself, further and harder than I thought. Miles, time, space, vertical elevation, weather: meaningless.

And I have some best friends. On the Trail.

Addendum

If you got this far, and you want to read an adventure tale that starts with a trek in Nepal that went horribly wrong, check out my second book:

9781632100085-SOTG-Nepalt.indd

If this were a bookstore, you would read the back of the book-decide to buy. Find this on Amazon at https://goo.gl/PGTW30

 

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2 Comments

Filed under Appalachian Trail 2012, Maine

2 responses to “What I learned from hiking (in 2010)

  1. loved reading this one, especially because you describe your 2010 experiences with the same wonderment as if you were still a little boy…i love you, dad!

  2. Aragorn

    Amazing! I too remember being exposed to the Great Outdoors via the Boy Scouts. I remember our troop’s weekly meetings in the basement of the sponsor’s parochial school. Your essay recalled to mind a scene of eleven- and twelve-year old boys working together to get some woodlands skills as they went over the material in the Boy Scout Handbook in small group discussions in the catacombs of the building. I was among them.

    The topic was hiking, and we were testing each others’ knowledge of what the Handbook had to say about hiking. One of us challenged Harold B., a good-natured kid, to demonstrate the correct technique of walking for a hike.

    With much serious and focus, Harold proceeded to walk a straight line, in which he carefully planted each foot on the floor by aligning the leading foot with the back one. The heels of the leading foot would be about a foot or so ahead of the toes of the trailing foot. At the time it looked as if Harold were walking a tight rope, but today, with the benefit of insights gained from modern TV viewing, I’d be more inclined to describe Harold’s walk as performing a sobriety check for the police.

    None of us said anything, since implicitly we agreed that Harold was demonstrating the recommened method of walking. After all, we had read and remembered the Handbook’s instructions on how to walk:

    “You put one foot in front of the other.”

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