teaching delegation and the Nurse Practice Act, part 3 Jan 1 2014

Third in a series.

Background: How did I get involved with the topic of delegation?

Yes folks, I have fifteen years of critical care nursing  experience, and I am a former ACLS Instructor and ACLS Regional Faculty. I love those subjects, they are exciting and fun.

By contrast, delegation is boring, a sort of grind-it-out, eat-your-spinach-and-take-your-medicine area of nursing.  At least, up until the time you get in trouble with it somehow.

In 2002 I took a faculty job at a school of nursing on the east coast where they were having a low pass rate on the NCLEX exam for first-time takers. At the time of hire I was tasked with re-evaluating course content for the leadership and management class I would teach, to strengthen the NCLEX first-time takers pass rate. (I detest the idea of using in-class time to do review questions.)  After researching this, I found the resources I list here in these blog entries. And by the way, that school on the east coast had a timely and gratifying increase in our pass rates once we gave proper attention to this material.

The first part of the this series dealt with a way to conceptualize the definition of nursing in a way that makes “delegation” easy to understand, using a short YouTube video;

The second part dealt with how a teacher can use certain in-class simulation exercises to show a practical way that nurses implement the Nurse Practice Act every day at work. Summary: give them a list of patients on an imaginary ward and have them make out the nurse’s assignment. then discuss and critique. this takes the content beyond a dry lecture about styles of ward organization. In that blog I recommended the resources from Ruth Hansten, RN PhD, especially her YouTube videos.

Today – the third part of the puzzle. Working With Others from the NCSBN.  This is a 40-page FREE publication of NCSBN that goes into the subject of delegation-  in detail. Originally published in 1998 and updated in 2005.

The next piece from NCSBN is one I recommend highly. it is a package. First a video“Delegating Effectively: Working Through and With Assistive Personnel,” and also a set of overheads. It costs $299. If you click on the hyperlink with the title above, you can see the video broken into five-minute clips on the www.learningext.com website. Now I hate to criticize, but the video(s)  are not the most exciting ever. It’s the accompanying overhead package that is valuable. I used to omit presenting the video and go straight to the overheads.

I always preface it with the following disclaimer:

“This is not the most exciting. in fact, it is as boring as things get. BUT, the material comes straight from the NCSBN, and they are the ones who dictate the content on the NCLEX exam. It says in the exam map that 20% or more of the content of NCLEX is “delegation.” If you wanted to do well on the exam, doesn’t it make sense to go to NCSBN, find out what teaching materials they have provided, and then incorporate those exact teaching materials into this curriculum?”

Usually that short speech creates student buy-in.

ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY ROLE PLAY

In the Working With Others paper, there is a section on interpersonal skills, in which the point is made that “the best set of delegation rules will not be effective if the RN lacks the interpersonal and conflict-resolution skills to carry them out.” (sic).   and so the Working With Others paper has a lot of emphasis on communication and interpersonal skills. This is excellent, very practical. In the package with the overheads and video, you will find a set of seven suggested role play exercises dealing with conflict arising out of delegation. These are pure gold. I always use them. they provide excellent fodder for in-class discussion of delegation.

Cultural comfort with perceived aggressive behavior?

As a complete aside, while in Hawaii I volunteer as a guest lecturer for NAMI and friends, a group in Waipahu that works with newly arrived immigrants from the Philippines who attended nursing school there and now wish to prepare for the USA NCLEX. I always provide this content for that group. When I do the role-plays with recent immigrants in the class, they invariably have difficulty showing assertive behavior. There seems to me to be a cultural component in the reluctance to deal with conflict.  this is in sharp contrast with the more-acculturated students of Asian descent who are educated here in USA.

There are also generational implications for this. If the RN is fresh out of school, they may be in a situation where everybody they supervise is older than they are. but that is subject for another blog entirely…..

I have one more entry in this series. why not subscribe to this blog and be sure you won’t miss it?

 

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1 Comment

Filed under foreign nurses in USA, NCLEX, nursing education, Nursing in Hawaii

One response to “teaching delegation and the Nurse Practice Act, part 3 Jan 1 2014

  1. Pingback: “Friday Night at the ER” is also Simulation and – your school needs it! | Nursing in Hawaii

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